What Kind of Math is Taught in Kindergarten? | Teach Tastic

Updated: Feb 19


In Kindergarten, children learn many basic skills that will help them in their future education. One of the most important subjects is math. Math teaches problem-solving, critical thinking, and reasoning skills. In this blog post, we will discuss the 5 most important math skills that Kindergarteners should learn.


Crucial math areas for Kindergarteners are place value, decomposing numbers, counting and cardinality, operations and algebraic thinking, and number sense.


Counting and Cardinality

Learning how to count is a Kindergartner's first introduction to mathematical thinking. A Kindergarten student should identify counting patterns and recognize that when you add one more item to a set, the number of items in the set increases by one. Kindergartners also learn about cardinality, the number of objects in a set.


Operations and Algebraic Thinking

In Kindergarten, students learn basic addition and subtraction facts within 20. They also start to understand the relationship between addition and subtraction, including how to add or subtract using a number line. In addition, kindergarten students learn that when you take one item away from a set of items, the number name for that set decreases by one. Kindergarten students also start to understand basic multiplication and division facts within ten.


Number Sense

Kindergarten students learn how to recognize and use different ways of representing numbers. Kindergartners are introduced to the base-ten number system based on multiples of ten. Kindergarten students also get an introduction into ordering numbers from least to greatest or vice versa. They begin their work with fractions by learning how a fraction can be represented using pictures, models or words. Kindergartners also learn about negative numbers and how to represent them on a number line.


These skills lay the foundation for future mathematics learning. Kindergartners who can understand and use these skills will be better prepared for the more difficult math concepts in later grades. Helping your child develop these skills at home is a great way to support their education!


5 Most Important Math Skills That Kindergarteners Should Learn


Counting and writing numbers to 100

  • Count to one hundred in ones and tens

  • Understand what they are counting

  • Tell you the number before and after their given number

  • Count on from a given number by tens

  • Counting forward from any given number between one and 100

Once a student has learned how to count to 100, they can move on to counting objects up to 20. They will learn that each number corresponds with a certain amount of objects. As they learn about counting and sequencing numbers, they will also start to understand which number is bigger or smaller. This is the beginning of learning addition and subtraction skills.


Why is teaching numbers to 100 important?

Kids should not just memorize a direct route from 1 to 100. They need to understand what they are counting. In kindergarten, kids can usually tell you the number before and after their given number. They are also able to count on from a given number by tens.


The Kindergarten curriculum focuses on the idea that an object can be counted multiple times. We use this concept to teach children how to count forward and backward from any given number between 1 and 100.

Write numbers 0-20 in order, with some help for a few of them

Explain what each number means (for example: "This number means there are ten things in total")


Understand that each number represents how many objects are in a set

Compare two numbers and say which one is bigger or smaller


Add and subtract numbers up to 20 (with help)

When Kindergartners can fluently count to 100, they have a strong foundation for learning basic addition and subtraction skills. In addition, kindergarteners begin to learn how numbers can be represented in multiple ways, such as on a number line or through objects.


Next is add and subtract using numbers 1-10

Adding and subtracting within 10

  • Addition with fingers and objects

  • Addition with fingers and objects

Kindergartners are able to add and subtract numbers up to 20 by the end of Kindergarten. They should know that addition is putting things together while subtraction is taking things away. They should also be able to solve basic word problems such as "If I have three apples and two more get added, how many do I have now?"


Addition with objects

Subtraction with objects Kindergarteners learn to add within 20 using their fingers or other counting tools such as counters. They can also add by counting on from any given number up to 20, including numbers greater than 19. Kindergarteners should know that addition is putting things together while subtraction is taking things away. Kindergartners learn to subtract within 20 using their fingers or other counting tools such as counters. They can also subtract by counting back from any given number up to 20, including numbers greater than 19. Kindergartners should also be able to solve basic word problems such as "If I have three apples and two more get taken away, how many do I have now?"


When Kindergartners can fluently add and subtract within 20, they are ready to learn about regrouping or carrying over numbers when adding and subtracting larger numbers.


Place value to 20

  • Decomposing numbers 11-19

In Kindergarten, students learn to round whole numbers to the nearest ten or hundred. They also learn about place value, which is understanding that a number can be represented in more than one way. For example, the number 123 can be thought of as one hundred and twenty-three or twelve tens and three ones. Kindergarten students also learn about changing representations of numbers, including the steps needed to go from base-ten blocks to a number sentence.


Classifying objects

  • Sorting objects by category then counting

After kindergarteners can add and subtract, they start learning geometry, including shapes like triangles, rectangles, circles, and squares. Geometry also includes fractions, so kindergarten math activities will include understanding halves, thirds, and fourths among other fractional parts. Kids would also work on reading and writing time, money value, and even angles in Kindergarten.


Shape identification

  • two dimensional

  • three dimensional

After Kindergarteners can add and subtract, they start learning geometry which includes shapes like triangles, rectangles, circles, and squares. Geometry also includes fractions, so kindergarten math activities will often include hands-on activities with fraction pieces. Kindergarten is also the time when Kindergarteners make the transition from working with two-dimensional shapes to three-dimensional ones!


The best printable math worksheets use the following items to assist students:

  • ten frames as a counting strategy

  • different counting objects for higher interest

  • number line for visualizing addition and subtraction

  • number bonds

  • tally marks as a counting strategy

  • number matching worksheets for number recognition

  • number matching worksheets for identifying correct number to matching word

Kindergarten math worksheets are an excellent tool for kindergarten teachers or parents who want to teach their children at home. Kindergarten math primarily covers the basics of counting, sequencing numbers, and understanding how adding and subtracting work in order to master kindergarten geometry skills like shapes (triangles, rectangles, circles, three-dimensional shapes), fractions (halves, thirds) among others.


For more samples of kindergarten math lessons visit Teacher Dollar Store's website today!

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